holyoutlaw: (me meh)

Although my season has ended as a KC Parks employee (about which more soon), I’m still interested in volunteering with them. To which end, here is a flyer for their upcoming events through December.

Fall for Salmon 2015

For what it’s worth, the ones I currently plan to attend are Cecil Moses Park (10/17) for Duwamish Alive!, White Center Heights on 10/31 (for Halloween! oooooo, spooky kids!), and Tanner Landing (11/21). Oh, and Taylor Mountain Forest on 12/5.

All events are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. King County will provide tools, gloves, and guidance. You wear weather appropriate layers that can get dirty, and closed-toe shoes or boots. Some water and light snacks are provided, but it’s a good idea to bring some of your own as well.

Some of these work parties are in parks that aren’t generally very accessible, so it’s a rare chance not only to help restore forests and salmon habitat but to get to see the parks.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (me meh)

Tuesday, May 6th, GiveBIG for North Beach Park!

Go to the Friends of North Beach Park page on the Seattle Foundation website, on Tuesday, May 6th, and your tax-deductible donation to support the restoration of North Beach Park will be stretched by the Seattle Foundation.

All moneys raised will go toward the restoration of North Beach Park, whether it’s to buy new plants, reserve crew time, help fund community outreach, or provide educational resources. Friends of North Beach Park is entirely volunteer-driven, with no staff and no offices, so even $25 will be a tremendous help.

If you can’t join us for a 4th Saturday work party, this is a great way to show your support. In three years of restoration, we’ve made tremendous progress so far, and as we begin our 4th year of restoration, even greater progress lies ahead. We’ve removed trash and invasive plants, and reintroduced many native plants to the park, from trees down to flowers and grasses. Help us continue this work with your GiveBig donation on May 6th!

Thank you for your continued support.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (me meh)

Here are the links that were on the handout for the forest steward refresher training on March 29, 2014. At the end I’ve added links and information received from comments during the presentation.

Green Seattle Partnership Forest Steward Outreach Toolkit
First place to go for public outreach resources. There is a PDF listing neighborhood events, with the general dates of the events and links to the sponsoring organization when known.

GSP provides a great kit of outreach materials, including numerous brochures, a small banner, and a table skirt. You can also get a pop-up canopy. Contact Andrea Mojzak at least four weeks in advance to reserve the materials. You have to transport to and from the Forterra offices (or storage locker).

ESRM 100 (UW)
All UW students are required to take this class. One of the assignments is to attend a three-hour restoration work party. The attendance can vary widely from the advance sign up, but we’ve found that the students who do show up work. The assignment is due about week six, so you’re more likely to get students early in the quarter.

Write to the TAs at eschelp[at]uw[dot]edu. Provide all the helpful details: the date and time of the work party, address of meeting location, the work you’ll be doing, what you’ll provide (there was a suggestion of “food” which makes sense)bus routes that stop near the park, and parking availability. I always offer a tour of the park or a Q&A about restoration and about half the time it happens. You have to provide a follow-up email to the TA’s saying who participated.

Facebook
There are a number of “Friends of…” Facebook pages that might be of interest to forest stewards. These include Friends of Cheasty Greenspace/Mt. View, Friends of Lewis Park, Friends of Seattle’s Urban Forest, Friends of the Atlantic City Nursery/Rainier Beach Urban Farm, Friends of the Southwest Queen Anne Greenbelt, Friends of Green Lake, and Friends of the Jungle. If you know of others, please mention them in a comment.

And let’s not forget, of course, Green Seattle Partnership Forest Stewards, which I hardly need mention because of course you’re already subscribed to that page. ;>

YMCA Earth Service Corps
There are numerous clubs in high schools throughout Seattle. They tend to be focused on on-campus projects, but they might be interested in joining a work parghety or visiting a restoration site. There was a large group from the Ballard HS club that worked in Golden Gardens recently. If a school near your park is not listed on the website above, write to Geoff Eseltine at geseltine [at] seattleymca [dot] org and he’ll let you know if there’s a club in your school. Not every school has a club.

Other Possibilities

This list includes ideas from the workshop and some things I just started looking into. In most cases, the only thing that’s happened so far is I’ve sent a query/contact email.

ENVIR 100
Introductory class for Program on the Environment students. This includes a component for a project in a local park. I’ve written to the advisor.
Seattle One Brick
From their website: “One Brick provides support to local non-profit and community organizations by creating a unique, social and flexible volunteer environment for those interested in making a concrete difference in the community. We enable people to get involved, have an impact and have fun, without the requirements of individual long-term commitments.”

I filled out their “Request Help” form Friday evening. Here is more information.

Intrafraternity Council
Panehellenic Association
The fraternities and sororities often have a service component. In both cases, I’ve sent a query email to their general contact address.

If you have any information on ways for forest stewards to do outreach, please feel free to leave it in the comments. I’ll make a new post if something works out really well.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (me meh)

I’m going to try to pull together grant information, mostly so I have it in one place myself. Please feel free to add information you think may be helpful; I’m sure this is really incomplete to start with. The specific focus is for people doing parks restoration in Seattle.


Supporting Organizations
These provide information on how to write a grant, workshops or educational information about grantwriting, or are clearinghouses of information about grants.
How To Write a Grant Proposal
Provided by the Appalachian Regional Commission.
Foundation Center
Clearinghouse of information about grants and granting organizations.
Puget Sound Grantwriters Association
Professional organization, just as it says. There’s no information about the cost of membership that I could see on the website, although they offer scholarships.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

We just did a section on Thornton Creek for Restoration Design. This video had some interesting information in it, and some good bits about Beaver Pond Nature Area.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

The Looming Collapse of Agriculture on the Great Plains

This article looks at some of the changes happening in the Great Plains, particularly over and around the Oglalla aquifer. Capital wants to turn the land into wind farms, so that’s what will happen. I think wind farms aren’t as scalable as once thought; a big enough concentration will slow down the wind.

Another possibility talked about in this article is rotational paddocking; moving herds of cows from paddock to paddock, making sure it’s grazed clean, and then allowing it time to regenerate. Helping this is allowing the prairie ecology to return, notably prairie dogs and their predators.

Organic farming is given a very brief over view in the beginning. More time is spend on perennial farming, adapting crop plants to prairie conditions by making them perennial (deeper roots, much less damage to the soil). But perennial crops is a good way to go, and returning the land back to a buffalo commons is good as well. To that end, the Nature Conservancy and other groups are buying large tracts of land, and restoring them to buffalo prairie.

It perplexes me that these farmers can see what’s happened to their land with decades of capital taking it over, and yet they resist government management. Soon enough, the agribusiness monoculture factory farms will be abandoned by capital, and then it will be the government’s business to restore land that is in worse shape than ever.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

Apples!

Apr. 29th, 2013 09:00 am
holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

Why Your Supermarket Only Sells 5 Kinds of Apples

This is more than just the headline may lead you to believe. The article does touch on industrialized agriculture, but it also talks about breeding apples in the 18th and 19th Centuries, why agrarian biodiversity is a good thing (and how it’s being lost) and much more. Including a handy guide to being on Earth.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

One of the attractions of urban restoration to me is the way it breaks down the false dichotomy separating nature and the city. It forces us to connect with nature where we are, immediately. Nature is not something we drive to visit, not something remote photographed for the BBC or PBS, it’s right here. Ungainly, degraded perhaps, but still cracking through the cement, still living.

Thierry Cohen photographs cities and their night sky in a very meticulous fashion. He photographs a city during the day; nine so far, all cities large enough that we can recognize them at a glance — Sao Paulo, Paris, New York, Hong Kong. He then eliminates all signs of human activity, as if we had vanished completely.

He records the exact latitude of his position, the angle and direction of the camera, and then travels to a flat place free of light pollution at the exact same latitude. In the case of Hong Kong, that’s the Western Sahara, a distance of 7,800 miles. For New York City, it was the Black Rock Desert. He photographs the exact same night sky that would be visible over the city, even to the camera angle and direction.

He then carefully superimposes that exact sky over the earlier photograph of the cityscape. I’d have no idea if he used the right sky or not, but his meticulousness pays off, particularly when looking at several images in a row or different shots of the same city. We know the variation in climate and location of the cities, these photographs show us the night sky varies over them as well. Sometimes drastically different skies in the same city, depending on where you’re looking. He even works in the shadows of the cityscape, a detail that if missing would hardly be noticed, but when added is stunning.

There are several lessons I get from these photos. One is the distortions of maps and the world: I would never have guessed that New York and the Black Rock Desert, or Hong Kong and the Western Sahara, were the same latitude.

Another is the awesome majesty of the night sky that we’re missing. I grew up in Chicago, and there was so much light pollution that at best you’d see a few stars; the moon itself, if old or new enough, disappeared in the haze. I was 18 before I saw my first deep sky unscreened by urban light. I thought, if we live on spaceship earth, let’s build a few space canoes. And, if we could see this where we lived, if everyone in the world could see the night sky, there would be no question of directing our energies to going there.

A third lesson is that if humans did vanish magically, the world would abide. It would continue getting warmer for a while, but probably sooner than we think it would start healing itself and cooling off. I find that last reassuring.

I also find the photographs very aesthetically appealing. The oily darkness of the cities, the only color coming from the sky itself. The detail in both sky and cityscape. I could become entranced by these photos, look at them for hours.

Cohen’s photographs show us what we’re missing with light pollution. They provide another way of breaking down the city/nature lie. They show us another connection to the universe.

Links

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

How To Naturescape

A thorough-looking guide to the how and whys of naturescaping, as opposed to landscaping. For one thing, using locally native plants increases the texture and ecological services of a landscape. As they point out, using the industrial plants of large commercial nurseries results in landscape looking the same around the country.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

Can we please stop drawing trees on top of skyscrapers?

Putting trees on skyscrapers is the trendy architectural design element of the moment. Here is why, in detail, it’s a bad idea.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

http://nextbigfuture.com/2013/02/harvard-study-shows-wind-power-will.html

Behind large wind turbine installations is a “wind shadow” where air movement has been slowed down by the drag on the wind turbines. This shadow hasn’t previously been included in calculations of the amount of energy that wind power can contribute to the world.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

That’s one of the benefits of working in the forest that I tout. It usually gets a laugh, as intended. But — it’s true! There are benefits to exercising outdoors including changing terrain and wind resistance. Plus, it’s more pleasant. Not least because it’s cheaper and better smelling.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

These articles turned up close to each other on my Facebook feed:

Vortex Induced Vibrations: Ocean Currents Could Power The Entire Planet

But something to keep in mind…

Wave energy company trying to locate buoy anchor off Oregon coast

My first thought was “Transponder with Twitter account broadcasting hourly GPS readings.”

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

Floating Islands to the Rescue

Using floating islands as artificial wetlands to absorb nutrient runoff from commercial monocrop farms.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

When Trees Die, People Die

More of the evidence of a connection between trees and health. The exact cause remains an intriguing mystery, but the connection is obvious.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

Farming, Native American Style

A good report on the increasing evidence that Native American farming techniques were very productive and sustainable, compared to contemporaneous European techniques and even today. Studying the nearly exterminated techniques of resource management can help us develop permaculture practices today. In many ways, “restoration” includes restoration of forms of knowledge (Native American permaculture techniques) and restoration of practices (walkability in cities).

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

The Archangel Ancient Tree Archive is Cloning Trees to Save them for Future Generations

Old growth trees are being cloned in order to propagate and preserve them. The hope is that they will demonstrate particular vigor in regrowing, and hybridize or breed with existing trees to strengthen them.

Archangel Ancient Tree Archive

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

Our Changing Urban Nature: Time to Embrace Exotic Species? (Or at Least Some of Them)

Nice article on how the nature of cities is changing the way we look at what are exotic or invasive species, and how much effort we should put into removing them. Ivy establishes a monoculture and prevents forest succession, so we’ll always fight that. But even knotweed might have its virtues (shocking, I know).

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

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Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

holyoutlaw: (picture icon iv)

Here are some links to materials that I read while at Antioch that influenced my thoughts and practices. In many cases, they brought to the fore ideas that had been developing in my hindbrain.

On changing views of “wilderness”: The Trouble with Wilderness, or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature by William Cronon. William Cronon also wrote Nature’s Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West, an environmental history of Chicago that basically invented the field of urban environmental history.

On seeing nature in the city: “Thirteen Ways of Seeing Nature in LA” part one and part two, by Jenny Price. Also recommended: Flight Maps: Adventures with Nature in Modern America.

On the zoöpolis: Crow Planet: Essential Wisdom from the Urban Wilderness by Lyanda Lynn Haupt. Here is a link to her blog.

Seattle’s Native American and environmental histories:
Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place (Weyerhaeuser Environmental Books) by Coll Thrush. The Denny party was welcomed to Alki by Seattle’s Native American residents, but then they drop out of most histories of the city, except for an occasional appearance when someone dies. This book looks through all of Seattle’s native history, from before the Denny Party arrival to the present day. Of course it’s a much more complex subject than you first think.

Emerald City: An Environmental History of Seattle (Lamar Series in Western History) by Matthew Klingle. The environmental history of Seattle is also much more complex than you might first think. Everyone remembers the Denny regrade, but that was just the most spectacular of several regrades that happened all over the city. How the city’s coastline came to be, and how the Duwamish came to be so straight, are also topics that I found fascinating to read about.

On allowing kids to roam in nature: The Geography of Childhood (Concord Library) by Stephen Trimble and Gary Paul Nabhan. Having grown up in Chicago, where there was little or no opportunity for nature studies, I had an initial resistance to this book. But I think the important part, whether the roaming happens in the city or in nature, is that children do not get the free roaming that kids in my generation and before used to get.

Mirrored from Nature Intrudes. Please comment over there.

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